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Society Maintenance Charges

How To Calculate Maintenance Charges For Your Housing Society?

How To Calculate Maintenance Charges For Your Housing Society?

You bought an apartment and you moved in with your family and household items. But have you given a thought about maintenance? Though you own the apartment, you are a resident of the apartment complex, which means you are required to pay monthly charges for the maintenance of the common areas in addition to plumbing and electrical repairs inside your apartment. The expenses incurred in the common area are shared by all the residents and is collected by the residents’ association.

To arrive at the monthly maintenance fee for the apartment, you have to take into account the monthly expenses and an additional amount for maintenance and repairs. Though every residents’ society decides on the method to arrive at a fair and reasonable monthly maintenance fee, there are some general guidelines that one can follow.

You can find some of the popular methods to calculate the maintenance fee for your apartment along with their advantages and disadvantages below:

  1. Equal Fee for All

This is perhaps the simplest of all models where a fixed amount is charged on all apartments. However, it is also one of the most unfair. It works very well in apartment complexes with same sized flats. In most modern complexes, that is not the case and the small apartment owners end up paying an unfair amount of maintenance.

       2. Pay According to Area

The most commonly used and popular method to calculate the apartment maintenance fee is paying according to the area. A rate is fixed for one square feet and then multiplied by the total square feet area of your flat in this method. This means that if you have a larger home, you will end up paying more. The popularity of this method comes from the fact that it is easier to calculate. However, since the common facilities such as lift, garden, club, security services, swimming pool etc. are shared by all members, it is slightly unfair for the large apartment holders to pay more.

        3. Partially Equal Fee

In this method, a particular amount of money is charged on the area up to a predetermined square feet value. Beyond that, any increment in area is charged according to a unit decided by the apartment association.

          4. Hybrid Charges

In order to be fair on the large apartment owners, a hybrid method is implemented by some residents’ societies. The method involves splitting the charges into two with the first part including all the common expenses incurred on lifts, security staff salary, stationary, property taxes, conveyance, audit fees, meeting charges, common electricity etc. The second part includes the area based charges that are specific to the apartments such as water charge and electricity usage.

There is also a non-refundable sinking fund which is charged by the society for major repairs. Every member is supposed to contribute to the sinking fund, which grows over the years. It is conventional to collect at least 0.25% of the construction cost of the apartment excluding the cost of land as sinking fund charges. This also depends on the size of the apartment and the amount stays with the society until repairs are undertaken.

Though it aims to be fair on all parties, there is still a difference in opinion on which items should be charged as per apartment size.

Conclusion

As you have now understood, there is no perfect way to calculate the maintenance fee that an apartment owner should pay the residents’ association. Every model has its own advantages and disadvantages and depending on the apartment complex, the residents’ society should decide which model works best for them and implement it accordingly. Further, a half-yearly meeting should be held to discuss the feasibility of the plan and also to cut down any charges that are imposed unnecessarily.

Source: Artechrealtors (Link)

Sinking Fund for housing Society

Sinking Fund Housing Society – Why Society Need It?

Sinking Fund Housing Society – Why Society Need It?

It is risky to continue occupation of a building which has run its life. A provision has been made in the byelaws, enabling a co-operative housing society to collect contributions towards a sinking fund from members at a fixed rate per month. The rate fixed under the bye-laws is 1/2 per cent per annum of the cost of construction of a flat, payable in equal monthly instalments, as provided under bye-law No. 67(b)(i) of the bye-laws from the set revised in 1976. A building sinks in course of time due to its wear and tear but the land remains as it is even if the building collapses.

The basis on which the cost of construction of tenanted structures should be fixed: There are some cases which pose problems to societies in adopting the basis for the purpose of fixing the amounts of contributions from members towards the Sinking Fund. There may be societies which have newly constructed buildings as also old tenanted structures, the tenants of which have joined the structures.

There may be some other societies, in which new flats are constructed over the old tenanted structures and tenants thereof have joined the societies. The cost of these old structures is much less than that the cost of construction of the new flats and the contributions from the members of the tenanted structures based on such cost are practically negligible.

A society having a separate old structure on a part of the plot on which a new building is constructed, should ascertain from an architect the future life of the structure and fix the amount of contribution from each member, taking into consideration the cost of reconstruction of a new building thereon, of equal size, if the tenants do not desire new accommodation of large size, at the time when the structure would become due for reconstruction, the area of each flat and the accumulation of the amount of contribution to the sinking fund invested in long term deposit along with interest at the time of starting reconstruction of the structure.

In the latter case, the members of the tenanted structure, on which new flats are constructed have to bear in mind that the reconstruction of the building would include the reconstruction of the structure.

The rate per sq. ft. of reconstruction of the flats is bound to be uniform for all flats. It, therefore, follows that the value of the old structure, for the purpose of fixing the amount of contribution to the sinking fund should be based on the rate per sq. ft. of construction of new flats on the old structure. This would enable the society to build up its sinking fund equal to the cost of reconstruction of the building in course of time.

Source: Times Of India (Link)

Bye Laws for Housing Society in Maharashtra

MODEL BYE LAWS OF COOPERATIVE HOUSING SOCIETY

MODEL BYE – LAWS OF COOPERATIVE HOUSING SOCIETY

(a) The name of the society shall be……………………………….. Name of the Society

(b) The society shall follow the procedure laid down under Section 15 of the Act and Rule 14 of the Rules for the change of its name. Procedure for changing the name.

(c) The society is classified under major class “Housing” with sub-class Tenant Co-partnership Housing Society.” Classification.

Address of the society.

2. (a) (i) The registered address of the society shall be as under:

(ii) Address for Correspondence (as decided by the Managing Committee)

(b) Any change in the registered address of the society shall be intimated by it to the Registering Authority and all others concerned within 30 days of such change.

(c) Any change in the registered address of the society shall be made after following the procedure laid down in Rules. Procedure for changing the address of the Society.

(d) The society shall exhibit at a conspicuous place at the main entrance of the building, a Board indicating its name. Registration number and the registered address. Exhibition of Name Board.

II. INTERPRETATIONS

(i) ‘Act’ means the Maharashtra Co-operative Societies Act; (MCS Act) 1960.

(ii) Bye-laws’ means by-laws consistent with Act and registered under this Act for the time being in force and includes registered amendments of such bye-laws.

(iii) ‘Chief Promoter’ means the person who is elected by the Promoters, in their first meeting, or in their subsequent meetings in case the post of the Chief Promoter lies vacant, till the first general meeting.

(iv) “Committee” means the Committee of management or board of directors or the governing body or other directing body of a cooperative Housing society, by whatever name called, to which the management of the affairs of a society is entrusted and vested under section 73 of the Act

(v) ‘—– Days’ Clear Notice means the number of calendar days intervening between the day of posting the notice and the day of the meeting.

(vi) Flat’ means a separate and self contained set of premises used or intended to be used for residence, or office, or show-room, or shop, or godown and includes a garage, or dispensary, or consulting room, or clinic, or flour mill, or coaching classes, or palnaghar, beauty parlour, the premises forming part of a building and includes an apartment.

(Vii) ‘Housing Federation’ means the federation of cooperative housing societies, registered and notified under the Act.

(viii) ‘Ownership Flats Act’ means the Maharashtra Ownership Flats (Regulation of the Promotion of Construction, Sale, Management and Transfer) Act. 1963.

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